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Crossroads has you covered.

Very few finishes can define the style of your as profoundly as its doors. At Crossroads Building Supplies we offer a large variety of interior and exterior doors. With literally hundreds of options to choose from, our highly trained sales consultants can guide your through the process of find the perfect type, color and style of door to accentuate the uniqueness of your home.

Exterior Door Styles at Types

Style

  • All Panel – This style of door is an assembly comprised of stiles (vertical pieces), and rails (horizontal pieces) inserted into the door frame.
  • Glass Panel – A glass panel door consists of a glass door that opens onto an entrance, patio, deck or backyard of a house. The door panel is comprised of stiles, rails and glass to allow for viewing.
  • French  A frame around one or more transparent or translucent panels (called lights or lites) that may be installed singly, in matching pairs, or even as series

Material

  • Fiberglass – This material features both the feel and look of genuine wood, right down to the knots and cracks, with less upkeep. In fact, these doors are built to consistently withstand the rigors of any climate – hot or cold, wet or dry.
  • Wood – Wood comes from trees that grow in a variety of species, such as fir, pine, mahogany or alder. Each species has a range of characteristics, like grain, color and sap content, which contributes to its unique appearance.
  • Steel – An economical option, steel offers strength and durability and is a good choice for most climates. These doors are also treated to deliver superior rust-resistance. They will require only minimal maintenance (in especially moist areas, they may require minor upkeep).
  • Engineered Composite – FiberLast® Engineered Composite doors are made with a patented technology that combines weathering resistance, durability and dent resistance. They are stable even in extreme temperatures.

Interior Door Styles at Types

Style

    • All Panel – All panel doors connect two inside rooms or are used as a closet door; this door type does not have the strength, insulation or security requirements of an exterior door.
    • Glass Panel – These types of doors allow for natural light to pass between rooms. In the 19th century, glass was being added to door construction, mainly in French and German homes, on interior doors leading to rooms containing more natural light, such as conservatories, glass houses and vestibules.
    • Louver – A louver door is an opening with a series of horizontal slats, called louver boards, arranged sloping downward to permit ventilation but exclude rain, sunlight or vision. Louvers can be made in various shapes.
    • Bifold – Bifold doors are a segmented, hinged door that folds and slides on a head track to the side when opened. This door was first used during the 19th century and is now usually used for closet doors.

Material

    • Wood Composite – Made with a wood-based compound utilizes wood fibers, reconstituted wood or other wood derivative.
    • Wood – Wood comes from trees that grow in a variety of species, such as fir, pine, mahogany or alder. Each species has a range of characteristics, like grain, color and sap content, which contributes to its unique appearance.

Anatomy of a door

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A. Frame

The framework that surrounds and supports the entire door system.

B. Frame Corner Construction

Wood frame corners are sealed and mechanically fastened three ways—with a mortise-and-tendon joint, a sealant and a metal fastener—for exceptional strength and performance.

C. Unit ID / Serial Number

Most door products include a special identification number.

D. Steel Deadbolt Reinforcement Plate

Provides added security by reinforcing the deadbolt and strengthening the door frame (single in-swing doors only).

E. Optional Multipoint Locking System

Features three dual-action deadbolts that extend into the door frame when engaged for added security.

F. Sill/Threshold

The bottom of the frame that rests on the floor.

G. Door Sweep

Energy-efficient and weather-resistant weatherstripping system at the bottom of the door forms a seal against air and water infiltration between the door and the sill.

H. Weatherstripping System

Bulb-and-leaf or foam compression weatherstripping systems helps prevent air and water infiltration.